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Department of Physics

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CONTACT US

Physics
209.946.3130
Kieran Holland
Department Chair
3601 Pacific Avenue
Stockton, CA 95211
kholland@pacific.edu

CONTACT US

Physics
209.946.3130
Kieran Holland
Department Chair
3601 Pacific Avenue
Stockton, CA 95211
kholland@pacific.edu

The degree programs in the Physics Department prepare students to think deeply through questions about how the universe works, to find and connect abstract relationships to new situations, and to be academically confident and broadly knowledgeable scientists, teachers, and lifelong learners.


What do we offer?

  • Bachelor of Science degree in Physics, including possible concentrations in
    • Computational Physics
    • Astrophysics
    • Mathematical Physics
  • Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering-Physics,
    • jointly offered with Pacific's School of Engineering and Computer Science 
      Pacific is one of only 21 schools in the U.S. with an accredited Bachelor's degree in Engineering-Physics.
  • Bachelor of Arts degree in Physics tailored to prepare K-12 STEM field teachers

What will you find here?

  • Engaged Students-We have an engaged community of students following their curiosity and learning about the fundamental workings of the Universe, from entangled photons to supernovae in distant galaxies.
  • Expert Faculty-Our faculty members are exceptional teachers and recognized research leaders in their fields of study.
  • Undergraduate Research Opportunities-Because of our small size we can work closely with our undergraduate students and give them opportunities to participate in research.
    • Advanced Equipment-Grants through the National Science Foundation and other sources have enabled the Physics department to acquire highly sophisticated instrumentation that supports hands-on learning.


News:

Student Presentation

  • Thursday Sept 10, at 2pm
  • Olson Hall - room 120

Sweet Home Alabama: a Summer of Solar Research

During her summer in Huntsville, AL, Sarah Antonsson interned at NASA to conduct solar research. In addition to learning about Heliophysics and working, she spent her 10 weeks meeting many great people, learning about space travel, experiencing "the South," and drinking sweet tea. She researched “plumes,” which are feather-like features found on the sun in "mono-polar " magnetic field patches, and have not been studied in detail in the past. She finds that on-disk plumes form at the places of converging magnetic fields, and disappear when those fields disperse. Plumes outline magnetic fields close to the sun, allowing a better understanding of fine magnetic structures than before.

 


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